Catholic Mom: Your Choleric Child — Saint or tyrant?

Connie Rossini has a dynamic spiritual growth plan for her children and perhaps yours.  A Spiritual Growth Plan for Your Choleric Child is the first book in a series to support parents unfamiliar with the four temperaments as well as those well versed in the differences between their choleric, sanguine, phlegmatic and melancholic children. As in academics, we don’t strive to push them so hard that they grow to hate it. We teach them the basics at their level. Hippocrates noted four patterns of behavior. Cholerics react quickly and hang onto their impressions. Sanguines also react quickly, but their feelings fade. Phlegmatics react mildly with fading impressions. Melancholics react slowly, but hang onto their impressions.

Connie begins with the first temperament, choleric, that of her first child. She writes that the choleric is the temperament most likely to make a noticeable difference in the world. He may become famous or infamous – a saint or a tyrant. She encourages the parents of choleric children with:

God placed an awesome responsibility in your hands when he gave you this child. It is your job to help him overcome the tendencies that could make him a tyrant and strengthen the tendencies that could make him a saint. But don’t worry! God never gives a responsibility without giving the grace and aid to complete it. Even when you make mistakes, God will be there to make good come out of them.

Read more of Connie's wisdom about choleric spirituality at CatholicMom.com

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About Nancy Ward

Nancy HC Ward is a journalist, author, and speaker who blogs about Catholicism, her conversion, and Christian community at JoyAlive.net,
 7 websites and 7 magazines. She loves to share her faith story and help others share theirs through her Sharing Your Faith Stories seminars, also available on DVD. She contributed four chapters to The Catholic Mom’s Prayer Companion. She facilitates the Dallas/Fort Worth Catholic Writers and a critique group for the Catholic Writers Guild, where she serves as a board member.
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